Book Review: Ghosts of Gotham by Craig Schaefer

Ghosts of Gotham, out on the 9th April 2019, is the latest book from Craig Schaefer, who has spent the last few years writing a consistently high-quality collection of interlinked books in the form of the Revanche cycle, the Daniel Faust series, the Harmony Black series, and most recently the Wisdom’s Grave trilogy.

I was given an advance review copy of the book by Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This review avoids spoilers as much as possible.

I always enjoy Schaefer’s nuanced characters, and this book was no exception. Most authors in the urban fantasy genre either write antiheroes or paragons of virtue, but Schaefer seems to enjoy giving even the noblest of characters a few fatal flaws to make them feel more real and complex, without veering into edgelord grimdark territory.

Lionel, the protagonist of Ghosts, is one of Schaefer’s more wholesome characters, but even he has some personality traits that make him more than a clichéd urban fantasy hero.

Like Schaefer’s other protagonist, Daniel Faust, Lionel is prone to snarky humour. Despite this superficial similarity the two read quite differently, and I never felt that I was just reading another Faust story as I got into the meat of Ghosts of Gotham.

The supporting cast is also highly enjoyable, from Lionel’s work colleagues and friends in Chicago to the weird and wonderful denizens of New York whose acquaintance he makes during the course of his search for an original Poe manuscript.

On the surface, Ghosts is a literary mystery story, but it’s not too long before the straightforward plot goes off the rails and introduces us to a new world of magic and mysteries not linked to Schaefer’s previous works. I thoroughly enjoyed Lionel’s trip down the rabbit hole and didn’t want the novel to end.

I’m absolutely certain that Schaefer’s existing fans will love this book, but equally I’d highly recommend this as an opportunity for new folks to come into a series on the ground floor and have a taste of what’s on offer from one of my favourite urban fantasy authors.

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Book Review: The Nowhere Child by Christian White

This debut novel asks, what would you do if you found out that your parents weren’t your parents, and that you were abducted when you were a child?

I was kindly granted an advance review copy of this book via Netgalley.

Continue reading “Book Review: The Nowhere Child by Christian White”

Book Review – Jack of Hearts (and Other Parts), by L. C. Rosen

Publication Date: 30th October 2018

Genre: Thriller/Young Adult/LGBTQIA/Romance

I was given the opportunity to read this up-and-coming novel courtesy, of the publishers and via Netgalley

First of all, I wish that books like this had been around when I was a teenager. Hell, I wish that we’d had someone like Jack at my school when I was a teenager. So many years of confusion and discomfort about my sexual identity might never have happened.

Comparisons with “Love, Simon” are inevitable, so let’s get that out of the way. Yes, this book features a gay teenager. Yes, it contains a central hidden identity mystery that forms the core of the novel. Yes, it features coercion and blackmail. 

This book feels much more real, more authentic, much less of the Hollywood romanticised view of young gay folk… though it too has a few elements redolent of wish fulfilment.

I expect this book will be shocking to some audiences, because it features frank and detailed discussion of sexual acts between consenting people who are under the age of 18. It features such people smoking, drinking and smoking marijuana, too… and not being guilt-tripped or punished for it.

Jack himself, and his supporting cast of fuck buddies, friends, and compatriots, feel realistic and emotionally well-drawn. As Jack is slowly suffocated throughout the novel by the attentions of his stalker, I found myself hurting for him and just wishing that he’d open up to his mom and the other adults in his life, but whereas Simon’s silence in “Love, Simon” felt forced and unrealistic to me, Jack’s desire to ignore the problem until it went away and unwillingness to draw other people into his problem felt totally, heart-breakingly realistic.

For me a highlight of the novel were Jack’s advice columns, which tackled a range of subjects in what I felt was a heartfelt, funny, and effective way. Not only that, but his advice was absolutely spot-on, and highlighted the importance of communication and enthusiastic consent.

If I had to quibble about anything I’d say that perhaps the ending was a little too quick and convenient, but that’s really only a minor complaint… and honestly it was a relief due to the tension that had been building up over the course of the novel.

I highly recommend this book, especially for LGBTQIA folk and their parents. It would make a great gift for someone who’s recently come out, too!

Start Writing Fiction: Exercise Four

Turn on the radio and take note of the first thing that is mentioned. Use it as the basis for either the start of a story or an entire story – whichever, it should be no more than 500 words. Imagine a character, someone who is central to what the story is about. Try to use clear, vivid language so that your reader can see the character. Use some of the characterisation techniques we have talked about so far.

The first thing I heard was an article about refugees and the response of French right-wing politicians to the Syrian refugee crisis. And so, this.

Continue reading “Start Writing Fiction: Exercise Four”

Start Writing Fiction: Exercise Two

Review the notes you’ve collected in your notebook to find a character to develop further.

Pick a character. If you’ve collected, in your notebook, details about people you’ve spotted or spoken to during this week, pick one of these characters. Alternatively, you can pick one of the characters from the opening video.

Write a short character sketch – no more than 200 words – in which you concentrate on appearance and any particular mannerisms you noted.

You will come back to this later so save a copy on your computer or device. Continue reading “Start Writing Fiction: Exercise Two”